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america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
to the credibility and the future interests of the united states of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. they are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we say. it is directly related to our credibility and whether countries still believe the united states, when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they, too, can put the world at greater risk. and make no mistake, in an increasingly complex world of sectarian and religious extremist violence what, we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things, but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murder er like bashar assd can gas thousands of his own people with impunity, even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it, there will be no end to the tested of our resolve and the dangers that w
: in fact america filled 60 million prescriptions for sleeping pills last year alone. we are among the most sleep medicated countries in the word. >> we are a 24 hour a day country. we are always on demand. >> reporter: evidence of the widespread use is prevalent on face book where people post "can't fall asleep. taking my ambien. lights out y'all. and ambien, i got to agree that i have a love/hate thing with you. i'm talking to a doctor about getting off of you. >> you have people that come to you and say i want to get off of this. >> all the time. the majority of the patients i see. >> reporter: not being able to sleep can be a curse, affecting a person's ability to function. research shows sleep aid do work, allowing us to catch much needed zs. is a drug-induced sleep just as good as falling asleep the old-fashioned way. >> a lot of people feel it is real sleep. a lot of people don't feel the sleep quality is good. >> reporter: the doctor points out only a limited number of studies looked at long term effects of chronic use. that is something people don't lose sleep over as they. pop ano
oliver. i am still in for jon stewart who is scourge competing to be america's next top model. oh, no, they voted him out! they voted him-- don't listen to them, jon. you're beautiful on the inside! and there is no shame being more catalog than editorial. that's a fact. my guest tonight the writer, director, and staffer a very funny new movie "in a world" lake bell will be here. very good, very good. but we begin tonight with breaking news. >> the big chill between the u.s. and russia may be heading for the deep freeze. president obama has officially canceled his one-on-one meeting with vladimir putin. >> john: canceled? wow, that's a big diplomatic slap in the face, a dip move, if you will. ( laughter ) although if the president really wanted to hurt putin he would have said he was coming and just stood him up. trust me, that hurts a lot more. or if you wanted to be more passive aggressive the president could have said let's meet somewhere that's not technically in russia like, i don't know, moscow airport. ( cheers and applause ) look, we all know-- we all know why this meeting was
of america and our allies. it matters because a lot of other countries whose policies challenge these international norms are watching. fate are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we saw a. it is directly related to our credibility and whether country still believe the united states when it says something. they are watching to see if syria can get away with it because then maybe they too can put the world at greater risk. make no mistake. in an increasingly complicated world of sectarian and religious extremist violence, what we choose to do or not do matters in real ways to our own security. some cite the risk of doing things but we need to ask what is the risk of doing nothing? it matters because if we choose to live in a world where a thug and a murderer like the shark assad can gas thousands of his people with impunity even after the united states and our allies said no and then the world does nothing about it there will be no end to the test of hours of the dangers that will flow from those others who believe that they can do as t
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
holly williams they're advising america where to attack. and is the comeback over? wall street worries about war and housing. >> a cbs news poll finds race relations are going backward in the u.s. we're on the national mall, marking 50 years since the historic march on washington. a ground-breaking court ruling says you can be in trouble for sending a text to someone who is driving. >> we begin this morning with a look at today's "eye opener," your world in 90 seconds. >> if the order comes, you're ready to go, like that? >> we're ready to go like that. >> washington weighs the consequences for syria. >> u.s.-led military strike against syria could be launched as early as tomorrow. >> this is turning into a regional conflict and we need to reverse it. now is an opportunity to do so. >> the dow had its worst day since june. as possible military strikes hangs over wall street. >> bragging about taking control over media websites including twitter and "the new york times." >> fire continues to spread near yosemite. now growing 280 square miles, destroying more than 100 buildings. >> final
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
. they would say, the united states of america are. which signaled that it was not quite holding together. there was a fear it was holding -- going to fall apart. they called it regionalism, and later they call is sectionalism as they head to the civil war. so we know that nation is going to be a strong nation state, it is a democracy, and a two-party system and a strong president. that was none of the things the founders had intended. we look back and see that time as a time of growing pains. and we see dolley madison not knowing how this would end, was the perfect person to ease into the country and twa it was going to be. >> serving as the chief executive of the nation, he brought the real concept of how he wanted the role to be carried out. how did he approach it and how did she help him? >> well, you said "concept," and i think that's perfect, because he was the idea guy. he was very theoretical. he and other members of the founding generation understood as a concept "unit." it was their number one job. how do you do it? how do you bring forth unity? what dolley madison did is take t
of the united states of america, and to me, everybody that's willing -- strike that. everybody that's able to make that contribution should be forced to do it. then when the congress says that it's mandatory that we send troops, and these troops may be in harm's way, members of congress will hear from their voters, and their voters would say whether or not in their opinion there should be a red line, or in their opinion, whether or not the united states should attack another country, whether you call it war, limited war, the fact remains we were looking for weapons of mass sdru destructions, we didn't find it. so we know what war is, and people that have been involved in war know that it's hell, and it shouldn't be based on drawing red lines. >> you're obviously being very critical of the president right now for drawing that red line. i want to get reaction from your colleague, republican congressman peter king of long island. he's the chairman of the house subcommittee on counterterrorism -- counterintelligence and terrorism. this is a statement. i'll read it to you, congressman. presiden
and our values. and to others around the world, i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. our intelligence is focused above all on finding the information necessary to protect our people and, in many cases, detect our allies. it's true -- protect our allies. it's true, we have surveillance capability, but it is also true that we have shown a restraint that many governments around the world won't even think of doing or refuse to show. that includes, by the way, some of america's most of her -- most we should not. forget stricter guidelines. some other governments will throw their citizens in prison for what they say online. let me close with one additional thought. the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they are patriots. and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on the -- on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country and want to live up to our highest ideals. so this i
-market system in the united states of america. [applause] i am working every day to try to help carry that free-market message and try to help when the argument. how many of you have phones on you? take out your phones and text the word growth to 33733. text "growth" to 33733. we are working to try to build a conservative army across this country that will stand up and fight to bring us back to our free-market principles, bring us back to our constitutional liberties, and the only way we can do it is to bring together millions of conservatives across the country. freedom is not some abstract academic concept. it is something we know in our own lives. in my life, my dad was born in cuba. he was imprisoned and tortured, almost beaten to death. he fled in 1957, fleeing the batista regime. he was 18 and could not speak a word of english. nothing but $100 in his underwear. i don't advise carrying money in your underwear. he washed dishes to pay his way to the university of texas. he went on to start a small business, to work words the american dream. my dad used to say to me over and over again, and
for your ice ballet. come on, come on, now. is there nothing else that led america to this. >> president obama is cancelling his meeting with russia's president putin over tensions becausest n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. >> john: yes, that is clearly the only reason. it's-- it's always a good idea to pad out with what you really want to say with self-righteous human rights stuff like, "kimberly, we need a break. i don't like your stance on chine and tibetan monks and your boobs are weirding me out." if we want snowden back all we need to do is convince vladimir putin that snowden is gay. that away wayhe'llob a plane into u.s. custody faster than a definitely not homoerotic team of elastic clad men. that quick. actually, russia is not only global leadership story we're dealing with tonight which brins us to our new segment... indeed. now, we've already dealt with russia, so let's see where our magical dploab will take us next egypt! egypt. i just lift egypt. i'm not-- i'm not used to guns. ( laughter ) as the situation in egypt continues to devolve, the u.s. like a polar bear on a hastily
family. see the obama's new, adorable puppy. >> america's favorite mini-commander-in-chief. landing a big scoop and pretty coveted kiss. all ahead in "the skinny." it's tuesday, august 20th. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now" with john muller and diana perez. >>> good tuesday morning. we are going to begin this half hour with news of a significant arrest in egypt. spiritual leader of the muslim brotherhood in police custody. >> this comes as the u.s. is considering its options in the region. abc's karen travers joining us from washington with more on this. karen? >> reporter: good morning, diana. good morning, john. secretary of defense chuck hagel admitted yesterday there isn't much the u.s. can do right now. this is up to the egyptian people. an uneasy calm in egypt, a break from the horrific violence last week. but a brazen daylight attack in the sinai peninsula. militants ambushed two buses carrying off duty police officers forced them to lie on the ground before they shot them 25 were killed. here in washington the obama administration is anxiously monitoring the s
by french revolutionaries and the a were influencing people in america. there were rumors that cities would be burned. it was terrorism they were anticipating. for example, the opposition party, the democratic republican party was very enthusiastic about the french and some of the ideals of the french revolution. >> jefferson in particular. >> this is where they begin to go in different directions. also, some of the press is very vehement in their criticism of the administration. so they muzzled the press and said that this is probably the thing that john adams is most criticized for. abigail, i believe, supported john. abigail was even more vehement during i think she is even more conservative than john during that time. >> the upshot of this, the people who were breaking the alien and sedition acts -- >> you could be jailed. >> it was said that the press made things up. he had no standards. it was not the they were supporting the french, but they were making up stories that were not the truth europe adams was very seriously worried about this. jefferson -- that were not the truth. adams w
of the march on washington. during his remarks he called on america kind of to in his words he said to take on the great unfinished business of the march and he was talking about addressing income disparity, that was one of his big i think themes of the speech. what do you think the big takeaways were of his remarks? a lot of people were waiting to hear what we to say. >> largely will you view this through the prism of your own life and experience. democrats are going to view it differently than republicans, white americans view it differently than african-americans. common things i talked to at the march is they found it less personal and more political than they anticipated. the president only made a brief reference talking about the advancement of african-americans in politics and talked about state government, city government, congress, he said yes, even the white house now. the back half of the speech was about income and equality, education and equality. the president making his case that the country must do more, he needs help from outside washington. that was a key point. change doe
of the things we should take away from those statistics, that snapshot of america? >> one of the things is there is an expansion going on. this is one of the things that is very difficult for the adamses because politics are changing, and the changing politics means they are new englanders. they are federalists. as time goes by, as the population moved south and westward, it makes it more difficult for politics that they believe in. >> we are going to invite your telephone calls. we will be going to calls in just a few minutes. i am told you want to read us a passage from one of the letters. >> i would like to remark on the 39-year life span. that is not exactly accurate to the extent that children died much more rapidly. if a child survived to 12, probably the life span was much longer. many, many people lived into their 70's, as the adamses did. >> the five children -- how many of them survived to adulthood? >> four. >> four? you are getting a passage ready for us. you wanted to read us from the letter we talked about earlier, "remember the ladies"? >> right. in this particular letter
. [ male announcer ] america's favorite endless shrimp is back! people wait for this promotion all year long. and now there are endless ways to love it... from crispy to spicy to savory. [ man ] you cannot make a bad choice. [ male announcer ] red lobster's endless shrimp! as much as you like, any way you like! you can have your shrimp. and you can eat it, too. [ male announcer ] try our new soy wasabi grilled shrimp or classic garlic shrimp scampi. all just $15.99 for a limited time. it's gonna be a hit this year. [ male announcer ] red lobster's endless shrimp is now! we would never miss endless shrimp. [ male announcer ] but it won't last forever. so come and sea food differently. that's why i take doctor recommended colace capsules. [ male announcer ] for certain medical conditions where straining should be avoided, colace softens the stool for effective relief from occasional constipation. go to colacecapsules.com for savings. >>> welcome back, everyone. united nations weapons inspectors have left syria with bags of evidence and stories from witnesses. as the world waits to hear wh
're on the tail end america's longest war and that changes people's appetite about what can be done surgical strike they used to call it. sound appealing but we've discovered it doesn't exist. the question is worded makes such a difference in the answer. we've seen over the past week has been an unprecedented the part campaign on of the obama administration. it's not like they said, we're going to bomb. building up and building up with the state department at the front of this reallyng system but trying to send a signal about legitimacy, justification, about they think they have support from the arab league, about the danger -- i want to make a point that peter made about iran, although it's true we don't want win sinceran to they've been supporting the syrian regime, iran is not the use ofth chemical weapons because they had chemical weapons used against them. quiet on this issue. gwen: let's talk about congress for a minute. boehner, the house speaker, wrote a letter to the president being there should meaningful consultation. everybody is interpreting what that means? war powersean resolu
. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
than nascar, the nba and america's pastime, baseball. the question is who really won in this settlement and does it mean anything when it comes to the impact of concussions in football? i want to bring in a man that any football fan knows very, very well. peter king, senior writer for "sports illustrated" and editor of the mmqb.com. thanks for joining us. really appreciate it. >> sure. >> first of all, help us understand this settlement. for a couple years now people have been saying the nfl faced an existential problem, concussions could literally end the game. so how big a deal is this for pro football? >> well, this was the storm cloud that was over every decision the nfl made, it was over every season the last few seasons because everyone knew that this -- there was going to come a day of reckoning. and the reason why this is such a big win for the national football league in my opinion is that even though, including the attorneys fees, it's going to cost every nfl team, every nfl owner about $30 million, this is $30 million payable over a 20-year period the owners are going to have
on political trips with him in the united states into south and latin america which was very unusual for women in her generation. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a young girl. she was very proud of the fact that she spoke fluent french and german which he perfected while she was at the content making the best of a bad situation which would become her mantra in life. when she married this was a way to escape both the boisterous mess of the children and perhaps some of the upset over the weaknesses in her marriage and in some ways perhaps was also a form of birth control because of worst the catholic church the catholic church would not have allowed any artificial contraception. >> host: she thought mine was enough. >> guest: she thought mine was enough and in later years she was on the merv griffin show in the early 70's and he brought up that her son bobby and his wife ethel had 11. rose said well if i had known it was a competition i might've had more than nine. >> host: i think it was a bit of a competition. there was one trip where they want to rush on that was unusual for w
states and said south and latin america which was very unusual for a. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a year and grow , very proud -- war of the fact. making the best of the best situation. then once she married is was a way to escape both the bush justice of the children, or have some of the onset of the weaknesses and in some way perhaps also a form of birth control pill is a catholic church would not have allowed any. >> she even maintained her schumer. the early 1970's. if i had known it was a competition and might have had more than nine permit. >> happy to surpass. >> one trip when they went to russia and then it was unusual for women. >> 1937, as of this would have been prior. >> her son in the apple of her eye had guns hang fund. -- the epitome of a capitalist and he said, you need to know the ways of future. socialism may be one of them. absolutely for the year between reps cool and when he went to harvard he went to london to study and then spent some time in the soviet this well fact-finding and would report back. so taken with his report that she decided t
, the islamists in syria will be emboldened, they will say this is america, turned you down again and the mother of arab states will see it as another sign of weakness and iran will be emboldened. >> let's talk about the arab league. those arab nations are not exactly taking a bold stand themselves right now. they've spoken out against the alleged chemical attack in syria, spoken out against bashar al assad but they're not ready to support any kind of military action here. what do they really want? >> the saudis and jordanians and others, their intent is to get rid of this regime. they want to see assad out and they want a tactical defeat of iran and hezbollah. they're not going to participate openly like some did like fattah in libya. one of the reasons we have this tragedy in syria is the regional powers are unable to provide the leadership, europeans on their own cannot provide leadership and because of the dithering of the obama regime, there is no leadership. everybody is waiting for an american leadership, they cannot do it on their own. >> president obama has a tough choice on syria. the
: every day more americans choose abc news, america's number one n it makes me feel happy and excited because i have a mentor in my life. it makes me feel good because i know i am helping someone. the first time i seen her smile, i knew it was gonna be a better year and a better day. she has changed my life, now i can be whatever i want to. she taught me never to give up, and i never will. mentoring works, become a mentor. >>> this morning on "world news now" -- moral obscenity. that's what the secretary of state is calling syria's alleged use of deadly chemical weapons. could the u.s. be on the brink of taking military action? >> fierce fire fight. monstrous storm of flames burning to yosemite national forest. the race to stop the fire from destroying ancient trees and polluting drinking water supplies. >> we never know the way the fires come up around here when they're going to overtake you. so safety first. >> a progress report as 4,000 homes and businesses are in harm's way. >> then watch out increased risk of walking while texting and talking on the phone. a killer combination. >
desire is not to get america into a third middle eastern conflict. but he had gone out and said himself that if the syrian regime used chemical weapons that would be considered a red line. once he put himself out there, i think it was difficult for him given the gravity of this attack, a truly horrendous attack with chemical weapons for him to do nothing. >> ironically, quick take, does russia saying don't do this help the chances that it doesn't have to be a military response? >> no, but my guess would be we're trying to send a message to the russian this is is going to be a limited strike. we're not trying to overthrow assad and that will lead their response to not be that severe. >> peter beinart thank you for the insight. >>> let's turn to dangerous weather at home, the fierce wildfire burning in and around yosemite national park showing no signs of letting up and it's threatening san francisco's water supply and power grid. the rim fire burned through almost 161,000 acres so far, the 13th largest wildfire inle kaical history. cnn's nick valencia is live in groveland, california, tr
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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)